The Urban Christian

by Chris Lorensson on 12 December 2008 with comments

I’m always talking about Urbanism. Not in the sense of urban environments but more in the new, more metropolitan sense.

Wikipedia says

Urbanism is the study of cities, their geographic, economic, political, social and cultural environment, and the impact of all these forces on the built environment. Urbanism is also a species of urban planning, focusing on the creation of communities for living, work, and play.

But that’s not really how I mean it, either.

Inner-city urbanism

I’m interested in how we, as people in big cities, live life. How life and lifestyles have changed in the inner-city environment in the past 9 decades. But even more interesting is how I, as a Christian human, actualise my lifestyle in this big UK city. There are so many facets to cover:

  • politics
  • technology
  • music
  • art
  • culture
  • transportation
  • work
  • family
  • marriage
  • friends
  • fashion

and there’s a lot more where that came from – diving life into those subn cultures we’ve all come to know, love, and find utterly undiscoverable. But I’m not going to cover that, either. I’m just going to bring it up, hope you think about it and get back to me. I’m looking for your experiences and what you’ve learned. I want to know I’m not the only one who cares about this. After all, it’s not like I have too much time on my hands!

and then mix in some Jesus

But as Christians, that pulls a whole other bend into the equation. If our hero is Jesus, and Jesus spent his time doing x (we won’t go there), should we be doing the same?

We’ve become techno-warriors…

…tailors of the urban mythology of the 21st Century. We’re writing not only this History, but also re-creating the lifestyle itself. What used to be postcards are now text-messages. Where a friendly teller would sell you a cupcake, we now buy guns at an automated checkout (with plastic). When we used to watch The Jeffersons on TV together we now zone-out on Wii Guitar Hero.

Things are changing, and so are we. Actually, we’re changing things.